Emma Hack painted geometric illusions on to the bodies of naked models and the resulting pictures are amazing!

Emma Hack is receiving global critical acclaim for her collection of geometric illusions, and with good reason because the art is absolutely stunning.

Geometric Illusions
The artist used a variety of patterns and colours. (Source: Barcroft Media)

The Australia based artist created her ‘Geometric’ collection in July 2017. Her technique involves freehand painting onto naked models and MDF panels to create the angular patterns otherwise known as geometric illusions.

Emma has received great acclaim for her refined body paint camouflage technique; through a combination of painting on canvas, body painting and studio-based photography. Her work evokes a rich array of visual narratives and magical realism.

Geometric Illusions
Emma has received great acclaim for her refined body paint camouflage technique. (Source: Barcroft Media)

Explaining why she chose geometric illusions, Emma said:

“Geometric creates a spatial difference between the muse and their backgrounds. It creates poses that contort and evolve the human form and its surrounding space.”

“The structured geometrical backgrounds juxtaposed against the flowing curves of folded torsos, arms and legs create a structural interest to the eye. It makes one still feeling ‘at one’ with their surrounds.”

Geometric Illusions
Her work evokes a rich array of visual narratives and magical realism. (Source: Barcroft Media)

Emma is best known for her Wallpaper series. In the series, she delicately hand painted her models to blend in with the designs of the late Florence Broadhurst.

The artist is also well known for her collaboration with musician Gotye, in his video for ‘Somebody That I Used To Know’.

The collection took 14 hours to paint and two to three hours to photograph. Emma’s new series is more abstract than her previous works. It is because the concentration is less about absolute camouflage of the model.

The nudes of Herb Ritts, Helmut Newton and Patrick Demarchelier were her source of inspiration.

Geometric Illusions
Her new series will be different to the ones she has done before. (Source: Barcroft Media)

Emma further explained that these works mold the human form, questioning where limbs start and end.

“Intrinsic flow between pattern and the muse match and merge, without planned consideration.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here